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Several ways to view Centos system version commands (quickly know the current version of CentOS)

For example, after logging in to the SSH server with the server that needs operation and maintenance, you must know what system image the current server is and what version it is. For example, we often use CentOS images, but different versions use different commands. For example, CentOS7 and CentOS6 are different. We need to use the Centos version to view commands. Here, Lao Zuo sorts out several common Centos version viewing methods.

 Several ways to view Centos system version commands (quickly know the current version of CentOS)

First, cat/etc/issue

 cat /etc/issue

When you execute this command, you can see that.

Second cat /etc/redhat-release

 cat /etc/redhat-release

Because CentOS is compiled from the source code released by Red Hat Enterprise Linux according to the open source regulations.

Third, cat/proc/version

 cat /proc/version

This command can see the specific information of the Linux kernel, but can't tell which version of CentOS it is.

Fourth, uname - a

 uname -a

Then we can see.

 [ root@bwh  ~]# uname Linux [ root@bwh  ~]# uname -r 2.6.32-431.23.3.el6.x86_64 [ root@bwh  ~]# uname -a Linux www 2.6.32-431.23.3.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Jul 31 17:20:51 UTC 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Here we use uname and uname - r and uname - a respectively.

In this way, we can choose one you often use according to the actual needs. Then remember him.

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